Words

Akkadian
dâmu - to be giddy, stagger (CAD D 80, AHw. 146)
Akkadian
danānu - a part of the liver (CAD D 81, AHw. 158)
Akkadian
danānu - to be strong

To be compared to Gez. dandana 'to be fat, stout', Amh. dännänä 'to be dense, thick; to be very fat', dänäddänä 'to be fat, stout', Muh. dənäddänä 'to be stout, fat, thick', Msq. dənäddänä 'id.', Gog. dənäddänä 'id.', Sod. dənäddänä 'id.', Eža dəräddärä 'id.', Cha. dərätärä 'id.', Gyt. dərätärä 'id.'. Ugr, dn is highly uncertain.

Akkadian
dannu - hard, strong (CAD D 87‒92)
Akkadian
dannu - vat (for beer, wine) (CAD D 98)
NA, NB
Akkadian
daprānu, duprānu, daparānu - tree-like variety of juniper (Juniperus drupacea) (CAD D 189)
Akkadian
darāsu - to trample (CAD D 110)

Var. darāšu

Akkadian
dāru - animal pen (?) (CAD D 115)

An early WS loanword in Akkadian is not to be excluded.

Akkadian
dāru - long time, eternity (AHw. 164, CAD D 107)

See also dūru ‘eternity; permanent position’ (AHw. 178, CAD D 197), dūriš ‘forever’ (AHw. 178), dāriš ‘forever’ (AHw. 163, CAD D 113), dāriš ‘for eternity’ (AHw. 164, CAD D 114), dārānu ‘eternal’/’eternal sacrifices’ (AYw. 163, CAD D 109), dārīˀu ‘(ever)lasting, eternal’ (AHw. 164, CAD D 115), dārīˀa ‘eternally’ (CAD D 112), dārītu (AHw. 164, CAD D 114), dārūtu (AHw. 164, CAD D 118), dārūtaš (AHw. 1550, CAD D 118). This derivation, unquestionable in terms of the underlying consonantal root and the semantic development, is not without problems as far as derivational morphology is concerned, as the expected prototype *dawr- (Marrassini 1971: 48, Fronzaroli 1965: 143, 148) would yield dūru in Akkadian, actually well attested with the same meaning (see above). No ready solution for this problem is at hand. Shall one postulate a bivocalic pattern *dawar- contracted into *dār- in the prehistory of Akkadian? Derivation from the by-form *dahr- is not to be ruled out completely, but does not seem likely.

Akkadian
dāru - generation (AHw. 164, CAD D 115)

According to a broad concensus (AHw 164, CAD D 115, Streck 2000: 88), an early WS borrowing comparable to Hebrew dōr and its cognates listed here.